Tess of the D'Urbervilles

A classic novel about class, love, and morality that masterfully questions social conventions

By Thomas Hardy Read by Jilly Bond Classics / Fiction / Historical / Literary English, Unabridged 16h 21m Sell Sheet
Format Release Date List Price Your Price ISBN
13 Audio CDs Tue Nov 21 00:00:00 UTC 2017 39.99 29.99 9781520085814 Add to Cart
2 MP3 CDs Tue Nov 21 00:00:00 UTC 2017 29.99 19.99 9781520085852 Add to Cart
Description
							Tess Durbeyfield, the daughter of an impoverished family, must navigate a world of desire and romance once she meets Alec d'Urberville. The son of a rich widow, he takes a fancy to her and gets her a position as the poultry keeper on his family's estate. However, her good fortune is soon complicated by Alec's libertine ways, and Tess returns home shamed. Once recovered, she separates herself from the gossip by finding work at a dairy farm outside the village. There, she meets and falls for Angel Clare, the eligible youngest son of the local reverend. But as her life begins to change for the better, she is troubled by a moral dilemma: whether or not to tell Angel about her past. Set in the fictional county of Wessex, Tess of the d'Urbervilles reflects on issues of classism, industrialism, hypocrisy, and virtue. Often considered to be Thomas Hardy's masterpiece, it received mixed reviews upon its publication due to its frank discussion of female sexuality and the hypocrisy of Victorian morality.
Reviews

"Hardy is possessed of the conviction that a novel is not a toy, nor an argument; it is a means of giving truthful if harsh and violent impressions of the lives of men and women... In every book three or four figures predominate, and stand up like lightning conductors to attract the force of the elements... In short, nobody can deny Hardy's power-the true novelist's power-to make us believe that his characters are fellow-beings driven by their own passions and idiosyncrasies, while they have-and this is the poet's gift--something symbolical about them which is common to us all." - Virginia Woolf