Betty Rosenberg Perlov

Betty Rosenberg Perlov, 96, grew up in the Yiddish Theater, where her mother was an actress and her father a writer and producer. Always artistic, she was a "child star" on her father's weekly Yiddish radio soap opera. She grew up, married, and went to college late in in life, obtaining a Master's Degree. She has always worked hard to share her artistic vision; this book is her triumph. She lives in the Park Slope section of Brooklyn, New York.

  • Rifka Takes a Bow

    By Betty Rosenberg Perlov

    Read by Elizabeth Cottle

    A slice of immigrant life on New York's Second Avenue.

    "Children won't know what the Yiddish theater was (until they read this title's informative afterword), but that doesn't matter much. Here, the focus is on the magic of performing and the wonder a little girl feels when she is - accidentally - on stage. In a direct first-person voice, Rifka begins by telling readers how Papa pastes on a mustache, and Mama puts on a white wig; suddenly they are old. Life can be fun for the child of thespians - stopping at the Automat for snacks and wearing makeup for fun. But when Rifka hits the boards, she is the one who gets the applause. Author Perlov, now in her late 90s, is the daughter of Yiddish theater thespians, so much of what she writes is from her own memories. Kawa's imaginative mixed-media artwork, reminiscent of Pamela Zagarenski's stylistic pictures, captures the fantasy world of the theater. A few photos at the end give a better idea of New York's Lower East Side. As the old rye bread ad used to say, you don’t have to be Jewish to enjoy this." - Booklist

    Released July 28, 2015
    English, Unabridged

  • Rifka Takes a Bow

    By Betty Rosenberg Perlov

    Illustrated by Cosei Kawa

    Read by Elizabeth Cottle

    A slice of immigrant life on New York's Second Avenue.

    "Children won't know what the Yiddish theater was (until they read this title's informative afterword), but that doesn't matter much. Here, the focus is on the magic of performing and the wonder a little girl feels when she is - accidentally - on stage. In a direct first-person voice, Rifka begins by telling readers how Papa pastes on a mustache, and Mama puts on a white wig; suddenly they are old. Life can be fun for the child of thespians - stopping at the Automat for snacks and wearing makeup for fun. But when Rifka hits the boards, she is the one who gets the applause. Author Perlov, now in her late 90s, is the daughter of Yiddish theater thespians, so much of what she writes is from her own memories. Kawa's imaginative mixed-media artwork, reminiscent of Pamela Zagarenski's stylistic pictures, captures the fantasy world of the theater. A few photos at the end give a better idea of New York's Lower East Side. As the old rye bread ad used to say, you don’t have to be Jewish to enjoy this." - Booklist

    Released July 28, 2015
    English, Unabridged